CG techniques

CG = Computer Generated

2D = two-dimensional = flat / corresponds to cartoon or cut-out animation

3D = three-dimensional = spatial / corresponds to stop-motion (puppet) film

2.5D = semi-spatial / corresponds to relief film

Just as in traditional techniques, characters, props and assets are created based on the artist’s designs. The only difference is that computers are used instead of tangible materials. The principle, however, remains the same and the work is just as laborious.

3D Animation (digital stop-motion)

The animated character is given an animation skeleton. The animator animates in a similar way as in traditional techniques. The difference is that in a puppet animation, one frame after another is animated, but in computer animation, the animator first animates the so-called extreme poses, then tunes the animation flow between them. A similar process is used in cartoons. The final image is created by rendering, where the computer calculates the illuminated shot frame by frame.

2.5D Animation (digital relief film)

It is animated in virtually the same way as 3D animation, but the image is intentionally flatter, objects are not animated in space, figures move from left to right and up and down, but not to and from the camera.

2D Animation (digital cut-out and cartoon film)

Animation is done in the same way as in traditional techniques, but instead of a glass table, a camera, pencils, paints, papers and cels, computers are used. They allow for more control over the result.

Motion Capture

Similar to cartoon rotoscoping.

Using a set of multiple special cameras and a suit with lots of markers, the real movement of a live actor, animal, or human-controlled puppet is captured by a computer. It is then applied to an animated character, which must have a similar skeletal structure to the actor who was recorded. However, it can look completely different. The animation is further modified and fine-tuned in the computer.

It is usually used to create tricks for live-action films or animations for realistic computer games.